Hyb-Man to transform production of smart electronic systems using 3D manufacturing methods

Paris, 5 April 2018 – The EUREKA PENTA funding program, managed by AENEAS, today highlights the Hyb-Man project. The Hyb-Man (Hybrid 3D Manufacturing of Smart Systems) project is developing additive manufacturing methods (also known as 3D printing) to enable flexible, first-time-right production of smart systems for lighting and automotive applications. Read more…


First PhD student on Hyb-Man project

Meet our new PhD student Jeroen Knippenberg at AMSYSTEMS Center. During his mechanical engineering bachelor and master studies at the TU/e, he developed a passion for the engineering of high tech materials in challenging environments. This passion has enabled him to work for example on lightweight carbon fiber composite structures in racing cars and from 1 July 2017 in the challenging field of industrial additive manufacturing. Within this field Jeroen sees an opportunity to enhance his skills as an engineer and researcher while contributing to the advancement of the industrial applicability of additive manufacturing.

For the upcoming 4 years Jeroen will be focusing his fundamental research, which is part of the European Hyb-Man Project, on hybrid 3D manufacturing methods for multi-material products with integrated electronic components. The goal of the methods is to enable flexible first time right production of smart systems for lighting and automotive products. “Currently the combination of multiple materials and multiple functionalities into a single AM product significantly increases the complexity of the production process,” Jeroen explains. “To be able to manufacture such products first-time-right,” Jeroen continues, “a thorough understanding of the relation between process parameters on one hand and intrinsic material properties and functionalities on the other hand is required.” For example it is important to understand the relation between sintering temperature of a conductive track and the corresponding electrical resistance. The possible track sintering temperature can be limited because of the use of other materials less resistant to temperature in the hybrid product, while the track resistance specification still has to be met. The research of Jeroen is to get this understanding by providing design rules for the hybrid 3D manufacturing process, based on the obtained insight in the process.

THE GOAL OF THE METHODS IS TO ENABLE FLEXIBLE FIRST TIME RIGHT PRODUCTION
OF SMART SYSTEMS”


Approach and challenges
His research starts with identifying individual input-output relations between process parameters and material properties. Then the relations will be studied by various numerical models and experimental material characterization. These models, each representing a small part of the production process, will be combined in a design structure matrix (DSM) and system optimization techniques will be used to identify the opportunities and constraints in the hybrid manufacturing process. Jeroen foresees a challenge in creating suitable numerical models for the additive manufacturing process, as the models are generally new for this industry. Another challenge is the effort of creating an overview in the large parameter space with these different relations. Two challenges that Jeroen is eager to take up.

Cost effectiveness and meeting rapid changing requirement
Jeroen hopes successfully to develop a 3D hybrid manufacturing process that allows local production of highly personalized electronic products without the need for product specific tooling and large stock of parts or products. “Advantages of such process is the cost effectiveness of the production of the small series and rapid changing in requirements from the market can be accounted,” Jeroen says.


Kick-off Hyb-Man Project

Together with 11 partners from Germany and the Netherlands we will develop and integrate technologies for additive manufacturing, 3D electrical structures, 3D assembly and interconnect. First time right production will be achieved by creating design rules based on understanding of product-process relationships and by developing in-line testing and quality monitoring as integral part of the complete production chain. In parallel we will develop two innovative product cases covering different applications and sectors (LED luminaires, automotive adaptive sensors) to demonstrate the hybrid 3D manufacturing approach.

Highly flexible
The resulting manufacturing process is highly flexible through the removal of product specific tooling, no large stock of parts or products, local production and form freedom in production. This results in substantial business benefits, such as: faster response to changes in the market, cost effective manufacturing of small series and customer centric solutions, and new product designs offering improved functionality and new form factors.

The project duration is 3 years, with a total effort of 56 person years from 10 partners: Philips Lighting, Bosch, Fraunhofer IFAM, Reden, VSL, Henkel, Technolution, Neotech, Xenon and AMSYSTEMS Center (joint center of TNO and TU/e High Tech Systems Center).

For more information, please contact Wijnand Germs (wijnand.germs@tno.nl) or Joris Remmers (J.J.C.Remmers@tue.nl).